Posts Tagged ‘feedback’

Kevin ‘KAL’ Kallaugher’s wall to fame

December 13, 2012

Wall-paper

Editorial cartoonist Kevin “KAL” Kallaugher‘s work has appeared all over the world and in several different mediums, including real-time 3D. But it may never have had it not appeared on a British school’s old wallpaper first.

Or if the English were fonder of basketball. With playing and coaching in Brighton not as lucrative as in Boston

He even worked as a maintenance man tearing wallpaper off the walls of a local school—but not before illustrating the walls with cartoons. One of the teachers saw his drawings and put him in touch with an art director who, in turn, suggested he tried pitching his work to the newspapers and magazines up and down Fleet Street.

After a successful tryout, he was hired by The Economist, where he’s entering his 35th year. Not quite “Good Will Hunting” (Kallaugher graduated from Harvard). But, how about that?

KAL, also a longtime cartoonist for my employer, The Baltimore Sun, whom he started drawing for again this year, obviously had the talent, and someone probably would have seen it sooner or later. The point is, sharing, even indirectly, made it sooner. If you don’t know where to start, start with what’s in front of you. Tack it to a wall. Put it down on paper. Or, yes, draw it on wallpaper.

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Hack Day wish list a window into educators’ world ??? and our shared future

November 9, 2011

Mobile-graph

Whatever happens this weekend at Education Hack Day at Digital Harbor High School, the inaugural event has already succeeded by surfacing such thoughtful proposals from educators on how technology might make learning more efficient, responsive and rewarding for students in Baltimore and beyond.

Asked what problems they would like developers to address, teachers and school officials went straight to offering solutions. Demonstrating a nuanced understanding of technology’s abilities and limitations while revealing institutional and cultural symptoms technology alone cannot treat, their creative but pragmatic responses should be required reading for anyone who tries to control or critique the difficult work they do.

education-hack-day-logo2

See for yourself on the hack-a-thon’s website and distribute up to 10 votes among the ideas you like. I’m supporting the eight listed below. My favorites grow the audience and generativity of students’ work through sharing and turn potentially distracting mobile devices into instruments of learning. Oh, the classroom noise meter is also one I’m loud on. And foreign language chat roulette is too cool for words, in any tongue.

‘Share work and projects with parents/family and other teachers’

Suggested by Billy Michels

So many projects are completed and sent home and nobody gets to see them but me. I want to connect the families with the classroom more. Show work of all students, share ideas, etc.

 

‘Hey Teacher’

Suggested by Andrew Coy 

I wish there was a way for a student to “raise” their hand with a web tool or iOS app that would send a push notification over wifi to the teacher. The teacher then could have a que of students instead of having students call out or raise hands.

‘Bring native foreign language speakers into my classroom via Skype’

Suggested by Henry van Wagenberg

What if there was a fun “language learning” video chat roulette where my students could pick the language they want to learn, and a foreign student from that country popped up to chat live in that language?

‘Science animations in HTML5’

Suggested by Mark Davis

Almost every animation online (from mitosis, meiosis, seasons, moon phases, states of matter – you name it!) are all flash. Many teachers have classroom sets of iPads but still need to walk down to the clunky computer lab to learn from animations.

‘A volume meter for the classroom like yak tracker but for iPod’

Suggested by Justin

A leveled meter to remind students of the noise level in the room. Green good, yellow a bit noisey and red too lound. Once they get to that level an alarm will sound.

 

 

‘I wish there was an app that could work with a positive behavior system’

Suggested by Charlie Gerancher

The application would work in conjunction with a positive behavior system. It would allow teachers and administrators to award different types of digital badges that would be compiled within the system. The system would also have a mobile interface to provide a way for schools to integrate the use of handheld devices by students in a positive manner.

‘Create a database of good story problems’

Suggested by Scott Messinger

It’s hard to think of good, rigorous story problems for students. It would be nice to have a database curriculum writers could use to enter and organize the story problems. Teachers in the district could log on and print off relevant problems for use in the classroom.

‘Get permission slips filled out and signed by parents’

Suggested by Paul Genge

Right now our parents have to fill out the same information ten or more times per year. If there were a way to get their information and a “fresh” signature somehow then that would save an enormous amount of time and energy for parents and teachers.

Learn more about Education Hack Day in this Bmore Media article or on the event’s website. Demos of the resulting apps, scheduled for 4 p.m. Sunday, are free and open to the public, but organizers ask that guests register.

Creative Commons photo by Flickr user opensourceway

ALSO SEE: Fast Times at Digital Harbor High: Catching the spirit of Education Hack Day

Charm lessons: A case study in social media customer service

November 6, 2011

Unless you’re throwing napkins at diners at Dick’s Last Resort or pouring drafts for molten lava men at Peter Griffin’s baseball umpire bar, there are certain phrases best avoided when addressing paying, law-abiding customers, especially when doing so over the air on social media.

Somewhere near the top of that list are “don’t come back” and “your standards are too high,” both of which the account for South Florida burger chain Charm City Burger Company, in so many words, tweeted in response to what appeared to be reasonable consumer complaints.

View the story “Case study: How not to handle customer complaints in the social space” on Storify

The above Twitter conversation didn’t quite go viral, but, for a local business in an industry as competitive as restaurants selling something as ubiquitous as hamburgers, it made more of a splash than it had to and than managers probably would have liked.

Heck, it landed on my radar, 1,000 miles away in Baltimore, although in part because Charm City is one of Baltimore’s nicknames.

What makes the back-and-forth particularly confounding is that the restaurant account’s first response was spot-on and that, according to the author of the Storify above, the chain had been widely praised for its social media savvy. To the account administrator’s credit, the answers to the customer, as of this writing, had not been deleted.

Based on the timing of the restaurant account’s tweets – the morning after the initial complaint – and the platform from which they were published – an iPhone – one can envision what might have happened.

The urgency of being hours behind negative feedback mixed with the false intimacy of a mobile device can be a dangerous cocktail. Whether or not this is what occurred here, it’s a good reminder for anyone who communicates on social media on behalf of a brand, be it an organization’s brand or your own. Before you post, detach yourself from the emotion of the situation and play the tape forward while you can still rewind it.